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Introducing our range of bows

An orchestral string bow consists of a shaped stick with bow hair (typically white horsehair) forming a ribbon stretched between the tip and the frog. This is used to ‘bow’ the string, vibrating it to produce a tone. Historically bows have been made of Pernambuco wood from Brazil. However, makers are frequently adopting synthetic materials such as carbon fibre and fibreglass to reduce weight and to decrease the burden on natural resources. Composite bows have become very popular, and some are now comparable to fine Pernambuco sticks. ...Read more

Introducing our range of bows

An orchestral string bow consists of a shaped stick with bow hair (typically white horsehair) forming a ribbon stretched between the tip and the frog. This is used to ‘bow’ the string, vibrating it to produce a tone. Historically bows have been made of Pernambuco wood from Brazil. However, makers are frequently adopting synthetic materials such as carbon fibre and fibreglass to reduce weight and to decrease the burden on natural resources. Composite bows have become very popular, and some are now comparable to fine Pernambuco sticks.

At Chamberlain Music we have a range of violin, viola, cello and double bass bows from MMX, Sonix and Stentor. These bows range from very affordable student models to step up bows and professional quality bows. All MMX bows are imported directly so you are always getting the best price possible.

MMX61 composite bows

The MMX61 bow is perfect for the student but offers much more than a typical student bow. Made from a carbon composite, they are lightweight with great feel, tone, and most importantly very affordable! Each bow features an ebony frog with mother of pearl inlay. These are great as a first bow for beginner string players, or as a spare for gigging musicians.

With superb quality the MMX61 bows combine the historical traditions of bow making with the latest in lightweight materials. This means that these bows are light enough to reduce fatigue during long playing sessions and don’t compromise on tone or projection.

These bows are a great choice for players of all abilities, ages and styles, popular with specialist string dealers, teachers and players alike we have bows available for violin, viola, cello, and Double Bass.

MMX63 bows octagonal sandalwood

The main difference between the MMX61 and MMX63 range is the material from which it is made from. The MMX63 bows are constructed from high quality sandalwood and are a great choice for students.

They are a great choice for replacing the bow supplied with a student outfit or to carry as a spare and back up option just in case. The octagonal sticks have an optimal curve and a good tension to help with string crossing on your string instrument.

All of the MMX63 also look the part with the detailed frog slider and the mother of pearl inlays. Available for violin, viola, cello and double bass it also comes available in a variety of different sizes so you will be able to find the right one to accompany your instrument.

MMX85 composite with wood veneer bows

The MMX85 string bows are much like the MMX61, made of a composite material which in this case has been coated with a real wood veneer. They feature nickel silver mounted ebony frogs with mother of pearl slides and are fitted with white unbleached horsehair for a fabulous tone.

MMX95 bows carbon composite

These are a brilliant second bow for professional players, or for any player looking for a quality lightweight bow that doesn’t compromise on tone or projection. The nickel silver mounted ebony frogs feature mother of pearl slides and eyes for added style. The MMX95 bows are also fitted with white unbleached horsehair and are a great choice for any player.

History of the bow

François Xavier Tourte pioneered the modern classical bow in the second half of the 18th and early 19th centuries. Tourte with suggestions from the virtuoso violinist GB Viotti, improved upon the limitations of the Baroque bow.

Previously a clock maker, Tourte added a great deal of precision to the art of bow making – one example was his perfection of the screw and eyelet system; a ferrule circling the frog tongue and hair ribbon that worked as a guide to flatten and widen the bow hair.

Tourte also viewed the frog as a precious item and worked with ebony, gold and tortoise shell. He standardised the use of ornamentation, such as inlay of a pearl eye on each side of the frog and covered mechanical parts with a pearl slide.

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Bows

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